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20120928
20121006
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how we hire teachers. not to hire new math and science teachers and create 2 million more slots in our community colleges so people can get trained for the jobs out there right now. and i want to make sure we keep tuition low for our young people. when it comes to our tax code, governor romney and i both agree are corporate tax rate is too high, so i want to lower it, particularly for manufacturing. taken it down to 25%. but i also want to close those loopholes that give incentives for companies shipping jobs overseas. i want to provide tax breaks for companies investing in the united states upon energy. governor romney and i both agree that we've got to boost american energy production and oil and natural gas production are higher than they have been in years. but i also believe that we've got to look at the energy sources of the future, like wind and solar and biofuels and make those investments. so, all of this is possible. now in order for us to do agree how to to close our deficit in one of the things we will discuss tonight is how do we do with our tax code and how do we make sur
the most government funded research fop push out the boundary of science and technology our best innovators and entrepreneurs can pluck them and start the new company. it you think about that as the formula for success an education we now -- well, roughly 30% of high schools drop out of high school. we used to lead the world in college graduates coming to high school. we no longer do that. on infrastructure, according to american society of civil engineers we're $2 trillion in deficit in terms of infrastructure. immigration, we have a policy now that basically says here come here get a great education and get the hell of our country. we are fighting on the simplest h1b issues that are vital phenomena the future strength. fourth the rules for incentive risk taking and recklessness. i don't think we have em i didded to the degree we want. on government funded research if you see in the gap it looks like ekg heading for heart attack. i don't know relative to what all i know in terms of the things that historically made us great, on each one of those, i see us not going in the direction we shou
in the science and in the super committee and that template is you have to do a large amount of spending reforms. assemble lectures on the route to higher revenue tax reform. you just have to follow that template and we would get to wherever need to to go. >> diane, what to make of this baseline issue? >> wow, i'm it is sad we have to rely on actually going over the cliff to stick to the current law baseline. that is my main reaction to it. and now, i think that it is too bad that it's been so hard to raise revenues because of the pledge. i think especially given that there's so many ways of raising tax revenues. so it goes back to my hope, that we can somehow get a budget process in place that honors the current law baseline, today's current law baseline and stick to it more aggressively. >> if i could just make one budget comment, which understand the question is about politics, but as officially scored in the joint on tax cbo, for example you made a policy that would extend permanently half of the tax in the fiscal cliff, because they're not to happen, that would be scored as a tax cut in the
." brigid callahan harrison, professor of political science at state university. herb jackson, washington correspondent for the record hurt and my colligan chief clinical correspondent for njtv. we have questions reported earlier by the news director of wbgo-fm, doug doyle, which is seen throughout the broadcast. here's the rules throughout the debate. each candidate will have 90 seconds for an opening and closing statement in a show of 60 seconds to answer questions from our panel. then move onto the next question. there is a timing light here to keep us on schedule. it is my job to try and force that. the audience has promised once again to make my job a bit easier and show proper respect to the candidates by holding their applause until we have this broadcast. it conducted during the conversation during the broadcast come you can follow us on twitter using the hash tag and jay debate. let's begin. we tossed a coin. senator kyrillos goes first. kyrillos: mike, thank you very much and to njtv and montclair state for this debate. you know, i love this country. i love america. all of us ar
. and so, you know, eventually i ended up in you see santa barbara as a student of political science. i think having grown up rural and kind kind of small, i guess i never imagined i could work in the white house or be part of the political campaign like the obama campaign. so i always coming in now, i was let the chance to do is talk like this because i hope there is something a mystery that might be inspiring as you allege are your success. and i think washington d.c. was for me on the other side of the road when i was going up but i know the world is smaller now and more accessible. but i think we can dream big dreams as my boss likes to tell me. my old boss likes of tommy. so we are going to talk about kind of my path to the white house. just quickly though, so i like to say that everything i learned about winning and success they learned on the campaign trail. there is always a winner and a loser. the political environment, just like the business world is highly competitive. and with every campaign season, there's always innovation incubators if you will. and so, guess the campaign
Search Results 0 to 4 of about 5